How to Prepare For The MCAT: A Comprehensive Guide

February 2, 2024

minute read

The Medical College Admission Test, or MCAT, is a rigorous exam, so if you are planning to take it, you should devote a lot of time to studying. 

Depending on the amount of time you have to prepare, and the commitments you are juggling alongside with the MCAT preparation, planning for it is the key. 

If you want to know how to prepare for the MCAT, this article offers a comprehensive MCAT guide that will surely help you ace your way to the top. Please read on. 


Table of Contents

What are the Four Sections of the MCAT and Their Format?

One of the essential tests for medical school admissions, without a doubt, is the MCAT, or Medical College Admission Test. This standardized computer-based multiple-choice exam is required for admission to most medical schools in the United States and Canada.

The Association of American Medical Colleges manages the MCAT to give medical schools with metrics for evaluating and comparing an applicant's qualifications and preparation for medical school. Admissions committees evaluate your academic foundations based on your MCAT score and GPA.

The MCAT is divided into four sections, each costing 132 points for a total of 528 points

The first three sections will examine students' scientific knowledge and reasoning skills in organic chemistry, general chemistry, introductory biology, introductory physics, psychology, biochemistry, and sociology

Students will be assessed on their ability to read, comprehend, and interpret humanities and social science passages rather than particular content knowledge in the last section.

Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems (Bio/Biochem) 

  • Duration: 95 minutes
  • Number of Questions: 59 questions

Life's fundamental processes such as growth, energy production, and reproduction are covered in the Bio/Biochem section. This section requires a thorough understanding of cell structure, function, and the interplay of organ systems.

The disciplines covered are:

Introductory biology

65%

First-semester biochemistry

25%

General chemistry

5%

Organic chemistry

5%

The foundational concepts required are:

  • Protein function, protein structure, bioenergetics, genetics, and metabolism
  • Prokaryotes and viruses, molecular and cellular assemblies, and cell division processes 
  • Major organ systems, nervous systemand endocrine systems, skin, and muscle systems

Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems (Chem/Phys)

  • Duration: 95 minutes
  • Number of Questions: 59 questions

Chemistry and physics are covered in the Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems section. This portion combines basic physical science (chemistry and physics) with biology to assess one's understanding of the physical principles that regulate life.

The disciplines covered are:

General chemistry

30%

First-semester biochemistry

25%

Introductory physics

25%

Organic chemistry

15%

Introductory biology

5%

The foundational concepts required are:

  • How living organisms adapt to their environment (forces, motion, fluid movement, energy, light and sound interactions with matter, electrochemistry, and electronics, atomic structure, and behavior)
  • Chemical relations with living systems (molecular/biomolecular properties and interactions, water and solution chemistry, thermodynamics and kinetics molecular separation/purification)

Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior

  • Duration: 95 minutes
  • Number of Questions: 59 questions

The Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior part assesses your knowledge of how human society, culture, and behaviors influence health. In the domain of biology, it necessitates an understanding of both society and psychology. 

This section is crucial since physicians work with patients from all walks of life and must understand how internal and external human-related factors influence behavior.

The disciplines covered are:

Introductory psychology

65%

Introductory sociology

30%

Introductory biology

5%

The foundational concepts required are:

  • Biological, psychological, and cultural factors all influence people's perceptions, ideas, and emotions to the world.
  • Biological, psychological, and social factors all influence behavior and behavior change
  • Psychological, social, and biological factors all influence how we think about ourselves and others, as well as how we connect with people.
  • Happiness is influenced by cultural and societal differences.
  • Class structure and resource availability have an impact on happiness.

Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

  • Duration: 90 minutes
  • Number of Questions: 53 questions

The Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (CARS) section assesses your ability to examine arguments and draw conclusions using logic and reasoning. 

CARS, unlike the previous sections, does not require a large amount of prior knowledge. On the other hand, this portion necessitates a strong set of problem-solving abilities.

The skills covered are:

Reasoning Beyond the Text

40%

Foundations of Comprehension

30%

Reasoning Within the Text

30%

Why Do Medical Schools Require the MCAT?

The MCAT exam is an essential aspect of the application process, but it is only one part of your overall medical school application

Academic capabilities, exposure to healthcare and medical research contexts, personal experiences, and interests, capacity to contribute to the university and community, and personal traits such as maturity and a desire to serve others are all factors considered by admissions committees.

According to Karen Mitchell, senior director of admissions service of the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges), the body that creates and manages the MCAT, it was created to identify whether prospective medical students possess the analytical skills and conceptual understanding required for success in med school.

Mitchell adds that the MCAT's format and content are influenced by medical school instructors, medical residents, and medical students' opinions on what academic preparation should be required for medical school.

How is the MCAT Scored?

The MCAT is graded based on how many questions you successfully answer. Each correct response earns you a number point, while erroneous responses are counted as questions you didn't answer.

As a result, if you're unsure of a question's solution, it's always a good idea to guess because it won't hurt your score. 

The total number of right answers in each section will be correlated to a scaled score ranging from 118 to 132. 

Each section's score is combined together to give you a total score that ranges from 472 to 528

Total scores correspond to a percentile rank, which indicates the percentage of examinees with the same or lower score than you. This will allow you to compare your score to that of other test-takers.

Sample MCAT Report:

Source: AAMC Official Website 

MCAT Score Components: 

Percentile Ranks

The percentile numbers on your score report indicate the percentage of test-takers who got similar or lower grades on the exam as you did. They display how your results compare to those of other test-takers.

The percentile ranks are revised every year on May 1st using data from one or more examination years. 

The percentile ranks are updated once a year to ensure that they reflect current and consistent information about your scores. This means that percentile rank changes from one year to the next represent significant changes in examinee scores rather than year-to-year volatility. The practice of updating percentile ranks is standard in the industry.

Confidence Bands

The precision of your section and overall scores is represented by confidence bands

The MCAT exam, like previous versions of the MCAT exam and other standardized assessments, will not be totally precise. Many factors can alter or influence a person's score. The ranges in which your "true scores" are most likely to fall are marked by confidence bands. 

Confidence bands are used to indicate the inaccuracy of test results and to prevent comparisons across applicants with comparable scores.

Score Profiles

Score profiles are offered to reflect your weaknesses and strengths in each of the exam's four areas. 

If you opt to repeat the exam, this part of the score report can assist you in determining which areas to focus on.

How to Plan for the MCAT Depending on Your Status/Situation?

The MCAT preparation process requires a great deal of forethought. Because of the MCAT's complexity, anyone planning to take it should devote a significant amount of time to plan, prepare and study. 

Depending on your current status or situation, here are some points to consider before registering for the MCAT.

Traditional Student

As more and more students decide to take a gap year before enrolling, the traditional approach is becoming less popular. The usual student plans to take the MCAT during their junior year's spring or summer.

Gap Year (or two) Student

This is a comparable path as that of a traditional student. They would, however, like to take the MCAT after their senior year. This option is great for students who know they want to take a year off to improve their application, pursue another degree, or simply relax.

When it comes to taking the MCAT, this type of student has the most options. When planning, it's crucial to keep track of your personal calendar. If you are usually busy in the spring, for example, don't take the MCAT in the spring. 

If you're not sure, the important thing is to remember that MCAT preparation takes time, so take inventory of your schedule and plan appropriately.

How to Prepare and Study for the MCAT?

When it comes to MCAT preparation, there is no right or wrong way to go. The key is to devote enough time for MCAT preparation, so you can achieve a competitive score.

Understand the MCAT.

The first stage is to know and learn about the MCAT.

MCAT results are required by nearly all medical schools in the United States and several in Canada, and many schools and graduate programs now accept MCAT scores instead of other standardized examinations. 

The MCAT exam assesses your ability to do tasks that medical educators, physicians, medical students, and residents have identified as essential for success in medical school and practice.

Consider Your Undergraduate Course Options Carefully.

Many pre-med students believe they should cram as many science lessons as possible into one semester. It is a good idea to major in a discipline that relates to the type of doctor you want to be, but do not focus too much on one subject. 

Having a well-rounded undergraduate education is important when preparing for the MCAT. You should have a well-rounded education that includes humanities, accountancy, psychology, and literature, as these subjects will aid your MCAT preparation in the four core test areas.

Create a Timeline and Avoid Procrastinating.

The most important rules of thumb for studying for the MCAT, according to multiple sources, are to start early and stay committed. 

Pre-med students should plan on studying for the MCAT for at least 200 to 300 hours. If the information is still fresh to you or you have not reviewed it in a while, you should prepare to devote even more time to studying. 

But, regardless of when you decide to take the test, do not put off studying for the MCAT. Make sure you provide adequate time for yourself to completely absorb the information.

Begin Preparing for the MCAT Exam as Soon as Possible.

Remember the three-month rule: it is a good idea to devote three months to studying for the MCAT. It is critical to begin your MCAT preparation well ahead of time so that you have the time to learn the fundamental topics. 

While you may have done well on standardized examinations like the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) for undergraduate entrance, the MCAT is a very different beast. It is exceptionally long and includes numerous courses, discusses technical elements of specific fields, and needs test-takers to blend knowledge from various academic disciplines on occasion.

Make a List of Your Objectives.

While achieving a specific score is likely to be your ultimate aim, you also want to set achievable goals for yourself during the preparation period leading up to the exam. 

This could contain things such as the amount of study material you will cover in a week, the number of hours you would like to devote to studying each and every day, or the score you aim to achieve on your practice exams

Smaller goals like these will hold you accountable and help you get closer to your ultimate objective.

Take Practice Tests to Increase Your Stamina. 

The MCAT is a lengthy exam. As previously said, you should expect to spend approximately 8 hours at the testing center. Taking practice tests will help you gain the extra stamina you will need to perform well on the real thing. You should also go through these tests on a regular basis. 

To help you learn and develop, we recommend keeping track of practice examinations on a spreadsheet. This will show you if you are prepared and on track to fulfill your objectives.

Take MCAT Preparation Courses.

Consider enrolling in a study course to help you stay on track. Many MCAT test-takers study independently, although it does no harm to review with specialists who are familiar with the exam. 

Pick a good MCAT preparation course that fits your objectives and timetable. If you are studying while also working in a lab, online test prep that's flexible and convenient can be the ideal option.

Do Not Only Concentrate on Your Strengths.

While concentrating entirely on your abilities may be a good preparation plan for other standardized tests, it is not the greatest method for the MCAT. 

Use practice exams to help you understand your strengths and limitations, whether you study on your own or enroll in an MCAT prep course.

After that, make a study plan based on the facts you've gathered. The most effective strategy will enable you to build on your strengths while improving in your areas of weakness.

Control Your Anxiety.

It is just as vital to take care of your mental and physical health as it is to study and practice. 

Working all day every day will not help you if you are so exhausted that your brain cannot function any longer. Make time for leisure, as well as exercise, in your routine.

MCAT 3-Month Study Plan

Creating your MCAT study guide is one of the most important aspects of MCAT preparation, but it can also be one of the most difficult. 

The AAMC recommends that a pre-med student study for the MCAT for 300 to 350 hours over several months.

Although three months may appear to be plenty of time to prepare, a competitive MCAT score requires many hours of study time each week. Below is a weekly timetable to aid you in obtaining your desired score.

MCAT Study Plan Week 1

  • To acquaint yourself with the full test and establish your baseline performance, begin by taking a diagnostic practice test or completing a question set that covers all of the topics from the MCAT.
  • Create a weekly study plan. Fill your schedule with study blocks, with the goal of studying for at least three hours per day, six days a week.
  • Create a rotating timetable that covers the following topics:
  • Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • General Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Physics/Math
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Additionally, daily preparation for the Critical Analysis and Reasoning (CARS) part is required. Read passages and study passage-related questions using the AAMC Sample Questions and Sections.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Full-length Test

Test Review; Planning

Bio, Biochem, CARS

Gen Chem, Organic Chem, CARS

Physics, Psychology, Sociology, CARS

Examine the problem areas and make any necessary changes to the study plan.

Rest / Day off

Topics to be covered are: 

Bio

Cell Biology

Biochem

Peptides, Amino Acids, and Proteins

Gen Chem

Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table

Organic Chem

Nomenclature

Physics

Basic Math and Statistics, Dimensional Analysis

Psychology and Sociology

Biological Basis of Behavior

CARS

Finding the most important information through reading

MCAT Study Plan Weeks 2- 8 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Bio,

Biochem, CARS

Gen Chem, CARS

Organic Chem, CARS

Physics, CARS

Psychology, Sociology, CARS

Examine the problem areas

Rest / Day of

MCAT Study Plan Week 2

Bio

Embryogenesis, Development and Reproduction

Biochem

Protein Structure and Function

Gen Chem

Bonding and Chemical Interactions

Organic Chem

Isomers

Physics

Translational Motion and Kinematics

Psychology and Sociology

Perception and Sensation

CARS

Finding the most important information through reading

MCAT Study Plan Week 3

Bio

Nervous System

Biochem

Enzymes

Gen Chem

Stoichiometry and Compounds

Organic Chem

Bonding

Physics

Energy and Work

Psychology and Sociology

Memory and Learning

CARS

Finding the most important information through reading

MCAT Study Plan Week 4

Bio

Endocrine System

Biochem

Carbohydrate Structure and Function

Gen Chem

Chemical Kinetics

Organic Chem

Ethers and Alcohols

Physics

Thermodynamics

Psychology and Sociology

Language and Cognition

CARS

Finding the most important information through reading

MCAT Study Plan Week 5

Bio

Respiratory System

Biochem

Lipid Structure and Function

Gen Chem

Equilibrium

Organic Chem

Organic Reduction and Oxidation

Physics

Fluids

Psychology and Sociology

Stress and Emotion

CARS

Fundamentals of comprehension questions

MCAT Study Plan Week 6

Bio

Cardiovascular System

Biochem

DNA and Replication

Gen Chem

Thermochemistry

Organic Chem

Ketones and Aldehydes

Physics

Electrostatics

Psychology and Sociology

Identity and Personality

CARS

Reasoning within the passage questions

MCAT Study Plan Week 7

Bio

Immune System

Biochem

RNA Translation and Transcription

Gen Chem

Gas Phase

Organic Chem

Carboxylic Acids

Physics

Magnetism

Psychology and Sociology

Psychological Disorders

CARS

Reasoning beyond the passage questions

MCAT Study Plan Week 8

Bio

Digestive System

Biochem

Biological Membranes

Gen Chem

Solutions

Organic Chem

Carboxylic Acid Derivatives

Physics

Circuits

Psychology and Sociology

Social Behavior and Processes

CARS

Reading and answering within the allotted time

MCAT Study Plan Weeks 9 – 11

Each week, start with a practice test and finish with a full day of review. Examine the themes and types of questions you are missing and utilize that information to improve your study method.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Full-Length Test

Test Review, Study planning

Bio, Biochem, CARS

Gen Chem, Organic Chem, CARS

Physics, Psychology, Sociology, CARS

Examine the problem areas and make any necessary changes to the study plan.

Rest / Day off

MCAT Study Plan Week 9

Bio

Musculoskeletal System

Biochem

Carbohydrate Metabolism

Gen Chem

Bases and Acids

Organic Chem

Phosphorus-Containing Compounds and Nitrogen

Physics

Sound and Waves

Psychology and Sociology

Social Thought Processes

CARS

Foundation of reading and answering questions

MCAT Study Plan Week 10

Bio

Homeostasis and the Excretory System

Biochem

Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolism

Gen Chem

Oxidation and Reduction

Organic Chem

Spectroscopy

Physics

Light and Optics

Psychology and Sociology

Social Structure and Demographics

CARS

Foundation of reading and answering questions

MCAT Study Plan Week 11

Bio

Genetics and Evolution

Biochem

Regulation and Bioenergetics of Metabolism

Gen Chem

Electrochemistry

Organic Chem

Purification and Separation

Physics

Nuclear and Atomic Phenomena

Psychology and Sociology

Social Stratification

CARS

Foundation of reading and answering questions

MCAT Study Plan Final Week 

This strategy will take you on the good path to a successful test day. 

However, if you do not feel prepared for the MCAT after three months, or if you are not getting a score anywhere near where you want to be on your practice tests, you should consider changing your test date

It is preferable to postpone your plans and earn the desired score the first time around than to perform poorly and have to retest.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

AAMC Practice Test

Review your tests and make plans for your final week of classes

Final review

Final review; Pay a visit to the testing center

Day off

Test Day!

Cell

Test Days Tips During the MCAT

The MCAT is probably the longest standardized test most premed candidates have ever taken, clocking in at 7.5 hours. While the notion of taking such a long and challenging test may appear intimidating, there are a few tactics that can help you get through it.

We have put up a list of test-day tips that will enable you to perform at your best on the MCAT.
  • Be at the test center at least 30-40 minutes before your test is scheduled to begin. Know the flow of traffic in the area to help you plan ahead of time. 
  • Prepare to produce your photo ID, sign in, and have your fingerprints digitally captured. You will not be able to test if your ID does not fulfill the required conditions.
  • Know what you are allowed and what you are not allowed to bring into and out of the testing room. For all examinees, the impartiality and competence of testing conditions are ensured by these test center regulations and procedures.
  • Remember to bring the snacks and lunch that you tried out during the practice exams. Do not bring food that you have not eaten and tried before.
  • Make use of the opportunities to rest! Get up and take a walk. It is an excellent method to clear your mind and get blood (and oxygen!) flowing to your brain in-between parts.
  • If you have used up all of your scratch paper, ask for more during the breaks. It is completely fine and the examiners will be happy to assist you.
  • Relax and stay calm. Being stressed and anxious will greatly affect your performance and might cost you dearly.
  • Have faith in yourself. Credit yourself for all the months you have put in. Do not forget to tap yourself on the back and know that you can do it.

How Much Time Should You Give Yourself to Study for the MCAT?

When should you start studying for the MCAT, and how long should you study for the MCAT?  

This is a critical question that must be addressed because if you do not plan ahead and give yourself adequate time to study, you could end up repeating the process for years. 

So, below is the rundown on how much time you should spend studying and it comes down to these 5 questions you have to ask yourself:

Have you completed all of your qualifications and are you confident in your understanding of them?

Students are frequently engrossed in studying for the MCAT's content. However, at the end of the day, the MCAT is primarily concerned with reasoning and reading skills. 

The MCAT starts with content and then asks you to apply what you have learned in foreign circumstances that need systematic thought and analysis.

Do you struggle with test anxiety or procrastination?

The mental and emotional aspects of the MCAT are the most common reasons students fail. This is in addition to not knowing your topic or having excellent critical reasoning/reading skills. 

If you are concerned about having these issues, you may need to take a different strategy and may take twice as long as others to achieve their goals. 

MCAT anxiety is difficult to overcome, but it is doable. However, to overcome this hurdle, you may require one-on-one coaching and tutoring.

What other commitments do you have?

Your commitments play a significant role. Taking a full-time course load while also taking the MCAT can be challenging. Those who succeed usually set aside some time in their schedule to focus solely on the MCAT. 

Similarly, if you work full-time, it will take twice as long because you will only have a few hours of study time, which will be of low quality and energy.

What score are you aiming for, and do you want to become an MD, DO, or both?

A person trying for a 505 is on a completely different schedule than someone aiming for a 515. While this is not a perfect approximation, you should expect your score to rise by 1 point per week. With a lower starting score, you need more time to develop a firm foundation, and vice versa with a higher starting score.

What is your starting score?

The order in which you begin has a significant impact on how long it would take you. Subtle factors like the company you chose for your first practice exam, which subsections are high/low, and how stressed you are about taking the first test all have a role. 

People who score poorly across the board will take much longer than those who score well in the sciences but poorly in CARS.

What are Some MCAT High-Yield Topics?

Studying for the MCAT necessitates memorizing a large amount of material that will be examined in the three science MCAT sections:

  • MCAT Biology
  • MCAT Chemistry
  • MCAT Psychology

It is critical to research the test content and format as you plan up your MCAT study program so that you can make the most of your time at each stage. 

Knowing the relative relevance of each topic can help you determine which ones are the most "high-yield," allowing you to make the greatest use of your limited time.

MCAT Biology

The knowledge of fundamental concept 1, which contains the following concepts, is tested in 55% of the questions:

  • Fuel molecule metabolism and bioenergetics principles
  • Genetic information is passed from the gene to the protein
  • Protein structure and function, as well as the amino acids that make them up
  • The processes that increase genetic diversity and the transfer of hereditary information from generation to generation

MCAT Chemistry 

60% of the questions assess your understanding of fundamental concept 5, which covers the following topics:

  • Methods of separation and purification
  • Water's one-of-a-kind nature and solutions
  • Molecule nature and intermolecular interactions
  • Kinetics and chemical thermodynamics principles
  • Biologically important compounds' function, structure, and reactivity

MCAT Psychology

The understanding of fundamental concept 7, which contains the following topics, is tested in 35% of the questions:

  • Changes in attitude and behavior
  • Behavior is influenced by individuals
  • Human conduct is influenced by social dynamics

Remember, however, that all of the fundamental concepts are equally important. You will not be able to get a good MCAT score until you review and understand each one fully. Thus, we do not suggest any study method that prioritizes high-yield MCAT themes over low-yield MCAT topics.

Additionally, remember that the MCAT exam is unpredictable, and there is no way of knowing how many questions will be asked in each broad topic category. 

However, strategic planning and targeted study should be an essential to your MCAT preparation.

Additional MCAT Preparation Resources

The MCAT preparation resources you utilize while studying for the MCAT can make or break your performance. 

As much as possible, use those MCAT prep resources from reliable sources. While some of them require you to pay, there are also those that are free and are effective. Here are some of them.

Additional FAQs – MCAT Preparation

How Long Does It Take to Prepare For MCAT?

The vast majority of candidates who perform well on the MCAT study for the exam for between 200 and 300 hours. 

Your test date, as well as other work and academic responsibilities, will dictate when you should begin your prep—usually 3 to 6 months before your exam.

What Is the Best Way to Prepare For MCAT?

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to preparing for the MCAT. An approach that may be effective and successful for a candidate may not yield the same results for others. 

However, it is safe to say that from the different preparation methods out there, such as enrolling to prep courseshiring tutors, and answering practice exams, to name a few, we strongly recommend that you try them all and find the one that works best for you. 

It may be costly, but at the end of the day, this is MCAT we are talking about, and it is worth the money. 

Is It Hard to Prepare For MCAT?

Yes, the MCAT is particularly difficult for various reasons. 

It is exceptionally long, includes numerous courses, discusses technical elements of specific fields, and needs test-takers to blend knowledge from various academic disciplines.

What Is a Good MCAT Score Before Studying?

There is no good MCAT score before you begin preparing for the MCAT. Having a low starting MCAT score, however, means that you would have to exert more effort in studying in order for you to get to your target score by the time you have to take the MCAT. 

It also means that if you have a low starting MCAT score, you would need to prepare and study for the MCAT longer than those with a high starting MCAT score.

When is the Best Time to Take the MCAT? 

You will do better if you take the MCAT as soon as possible. 

As the admissions season progresses, the applicant pool becomes increasingly crowded. Even if you finish the rest of your application early, the vast majority of medical schools will not seriously examine your candidacy until they receive a copy of your MCAT scores.

What is the Minimum MCAT Score Required by Most Medical Schools?

A variety of criteria determines the lowest MCAT score accepted for medical school. A low MCAT score for one student would not be considered a poor MCAT score for another, depending on your GPA and a school’s extra admissions requirements. 

If MCAT percentiles are being used, a score of roughly 500 will put you in the lower half of the group. A score of less than 507 on the MCAT is considered a low MCAT score for medical school.

Does My GPA Matter in Taking the MCAT?

Both individually and in combination, better GPA and MCAT scores indicate a higher acceptance rate. Students with higher GPAs and MCAT scores, in other words, have a better probability of being accepted into medical school. 

On the other hand, getting into med school with a low GPA is extremely difficult. The higher the MCAT score required for admission to medical school, the lower the GPA, and vice versa.

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